5 Star, Chennai, Dessert, Eating out, Food Festivals, Indian, Indonesian, North Indian, Street Food

From the street to the 5 star hotel

Street food is meant to be eaten on the street. No amount of five star intervention has traditionally added anything more to street food. If anything, it has only diluted it. Some say that the sweat plays a role in the flavour. I hope I never find out if that is true, though. Some say that the heat and the air play roles in the flavours of the street. Some say that it is all of the above and more put together.

Every once in a while though, street food gets a good variation. Not better or worse, but a good variation. The ongoing street food festival at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt hotel, is one such. While it is a part of their usual excellent buffet, there is enough from the street food counters that you could give the regular buffet (except dessert of course) a miss.

One of the tough foods to give a fancy make over is the vada pav and the pav bhaji. The chefs here gave the former a beautiful makeover and the latter a not so good one. The vada pav here with a nice potato patty was served with a fried chilly inside. With super soft buns and a nice tangy potato inside, this was a good makeover to the usually humble vada pav. The pav bhaji, though served with the same nice pav simply didn’t match the vada pav.  At the end of the first counter, scores were tied and it was Street Food 1, 5 star 1. The chilly not being super spicy helped!

Then came the variation. A keema vada pav. No, not keema pav, but a keema vada pav. Or should we call it a Shami pav? Unlike the keema pav which comes with keema instead of a bhaji, this was a mutton cutlet stuffed inside the buns and served with the chilly on the side. I stuffed the chilly inside the bun and burnt my tongue. I guess no two chillies are the same, since the first one was not hot and this one was burning every cell of my digestive system. The kebab inside though was beautifully flavoured and I took another piece and took my chance with another chilly. They were made for each other, this time. See? You only need to find the right chilly in your life! 😉

Then we came to the Laksa counter. An Indonesian Laksa, the pet food counter of the exec chef Teku. There was no blachaang in the laksa, but he was able to bring out beautiful flavours in Laksa without it. Yes, the coconut milk seemed a little thicker, but this was a richer laksa. No blachaang, so street food wins. SF: 2, 5S: 1. There was the momo stall next to the Laksa. Variations of momos, but the one that stood out was the pan fried momo. No street food momo (at least in South India) I believe can match the flavour of this pan fried momo that has Asian flavours and succulent meat inside the juicy flour! 5star made up and the score is now 2:2

It came down to dessert. There was only one sweet counter. That day, it was the banana pancake. It looked like it was straight out of the streets of Bangkok, but I wasn’t going to make any judgements till I ate one. We watched as a chef behind the counter carefully stretched out the dough and heated it in the tawa. He sliced bananas and added all the condiments. Once folded, he dressed it with various sauces and placed a dollop of ice cream and handed it to us. I took one without the ice cream. Yes, it was nice, yes, it was flavourful, but no, it didn’t match the banana pancakes you get in Thailand! So, it was street food 3, 5 star 2.

Dessert from their regular buffet was as excellent as usual and it complemented the meal well. While there were only four counters for street food (and the cuisine changes every day, so maybe some day there will be a Doner or a Wurst stall), but if you have two helpings from each stall, it can fill you up. There is always the rest of the buffet if you need more to fill you!

The festival is on till the end of May and is priced along with the buffet at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt. 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2sa2sXW

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5 Star, Chennai, Dessert, Eating out, Food Festivals, Indian, Indonesian, North Indian, Street Food

From the street to the 5 star hotel

Street food is meant to be eaten on the street. No amount of five star intervention has traditionally added anything more to street food. If anything, it has only diluted it. Some say that the sweat plays a role in the flavour. I hope I never find out if that is true, though. Some say that the heat and the air play roles in the flavours of the street. Some say that it is all of the above and more put together.

Every once in a while though, street food gets a good variation. Not better or worse, but a good variation. The ongoing street food festival at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt hotel, is one such. While it is a part of their usual excellent buffet, there is enough from the street food counters that you could give the regular buffet (except dessert of course) a miss.

One of the tough foods to give a fancy make over is the vada pav and the pav bhaji. The chefs here gave the former a beautiful makeover and the latter a not so good one. The vada pav here with a nice potato patty was served with a fried chilly inside. With super soft buns and a nice tangy potato inside, this was a good makeover to the usually humble vada pav. The pav bhaji, though served with the same nice pav simply didn’t match the vada pav.  At the end of the first counter, scores were tied and it was Street Food 1, 5 star 1. The chilly not being super spicy helped!

Then came the variation. A keema vada pav. No, not keema pav, but a keema vada pav. Or should we call it a Shami pav? Unlike the keema pav which comes with keema instead of a bhaji, this was a mutton cutlet stuffed inside the buns and served with the chilly on the side. I stuffed the chilly inside the bun and burnt my tongue. I guess no two chillies are the same, since the first one was not hot and this one was burning every cell of my digestive system. The kebab inside though was beautifully flavoured and I took another piece and took my chance with another chilly. They were made for each other, this time. See? You only need to find the right chilly in your life! 😉

Then we came to the Laksa counter. An Indonesian Laksa, the pet food counter of the exec chef Teku. There was no blachaang in the laksa, but he was able to bring out beautiful flavours in Laksa without it. Yes, the coconut milk seemed a little thicker, but this was a richer laksa. No blachaang, so street food wins. SF: 2, 5S: 1. There was the momo stall next to the Laksa. Variations of momos, but the one that stood out was the pan fried momo. No street food momo (at least in South India) I believe can match the flavour of this pan fried momo that has Asian flavours and succulent meat inside the juicy flour! 5star made up and the score is now 2:2

It came down to dessert. There was only one sweet counter. That day, it was the banana pancake. It looked like it was straight out of the streets of Bangkok, but I wasn’t going to make any judgements till I ate one. We watched as a chef behind the counter carefully stretched out the dough and heated it in the tawa. He sliced bananas and added all the condiments. Once folded, he dressed it with various sauces and placed a dollop of ice cream and handed it to us. I took one without the ice cream. Yes, it was nice, yes, it was flavourful, but no, it didn’t match the banana pancakes you get in Thailand! So, it was street food 3, 5 star 2.

Dessert from their regular buffet was as excellent as usual and it complemented the meal well. While there were only four counters for street food (and the cuisine changes every day, so maybe some day there will be a Doner or a Wurst stall), but if you have two helpings from each stall, it can fill you up. There is always the rest of the buffet if you need more to fill you!

The festival is on till the end of May and is priced along with the buffet at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt. 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2sa2sXW

5 Star, Chennai, Dessert, Eating out, Food Festivals, Indian, Indonesian, North Indian, Street Food

From the street to the 5 star hotel

Street food is meant to be eaten on the street. No amount of five star intervention has traditionally added anything more to street food. If anything, it has only diluted it. Some say that the sweat plays a role in the flavour. I hope I never find out if that is true, though. Some say that the heat and the air play roles in the flavours of the street. Some say that it is all of the above and more put together.

Every once in a while though, street food gets a good variation. Not better or worse, but a good variation. The ongoing street food festival at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt hotel, is one such. While it is a part of their usual excellent buffet, there is enough from the street food counters that you could give the regular buffet (except dessert of course) a miss.

One of the tough foods to give a fancy make over is the vada pav and the pav bhaji. The chefs here gave the former a beautiful makeover and the latter a not so good one. The vada pav here with a nice potato patty was served with a fried chilly inside. With super soft buns and a nice tangy potato inside, this was a good makeover to the usually humble vada pav. The pav bhaji, though served with the same nice pav simply didn’t match the vada pav.  At the end of the first counter, scores were tied and it was Street Food 1, 5 star 1. The chilly not being super spicy helped!

Then came the variation. A keema vada pav. No, not keema pav, but a keema vada pav. Or should we call it a Shami pav? Unlike the keema pav which comes with keema instead of a bhaji, this was a mutton cutlet stuffed inside the buns and served with the chilly on the side. I stuffed the chilly inside the bun and burnt my tongue. I guess no two chillies are the same, since the first one was not hot and this one was burning every cell of my digestive system. The kebab inside though was beautifully flavoured and I took another piece and took my chance with another chilly. They were made for each other, this time. See? You only need to find the right chilly in your life! 😉

Then we came to the Laksa counter. An Indonesian Laksa, the pet food counter of the exec chef Teku. There was no blachaang in the laksa, but he was able to bring out beautiful flavours in Laksa without it. Yes, the coconut milk seemed a little thicker, but this was a richer laksa. No blachaang, so street food wins. SF: 2, 5S: 1. There was the momo stall next to the Laksa. Variations of momos, but the one that stood out was the pan fried momo. No street food momo (at least in South India) I believe can match the flavour of this pan fried momo that has Asian flavours and succulent meat inside the juicy flour! 5star made up and the score is now 2:2

It came down to dessert. There was only one sweet counter. That day, it was the banana pancake. It looked like it was straight out of the streets of Bangkok, but I wasn’t going to make any judgements till I ate one. We watched as a chef behind the counter carefully stretched out the dough and heated it in the tawa. He sliced bananas and added all the condiments. Once folded, he dressed it with various sauces and placed a dollop of ice cream and handed it to us. I took one without the ice cream. Yes, it was nice, yes, it was flavourful, but no, it didn’t match the banana pancakes you get in Thailand! So, it was street food 3, 5 star 2.

Dessert from their regular buffet was as excellent as usual and it complemented the meal well. While there were only four counters for street food (and the cuisine changes every day, so maybe some day there will be a Doner or a Wurst stall), but if you have two helpings from each stall, it can fill you up. There is always the rest of the buffet if you need more to fill you!

The festival is on till the end of May and is priced along with the buffet at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt. 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2sa2sXW

5 Star, Chennai, Dessert, Eating out, Food Festivals, Indian, Indonesian, North Indian, Street Food

From the street to the 5 star hotel

Street food is meant to be eaten on the street. No amount of five star intervention has traditionally added anything more to street food. If anything, it has only diluted it. Some say that the sweat plays a role in the flavour. I hope I never find out if that is true, though. Some say that the heat and the air play roles in the flavours of the street. Some say that it is all of the above and more put together.

Every once in a while though, street food gets a good variation. Not better or worse, but a good variation. The ongoing street food festival at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt hotel, is one such. While it is a part of their usual excellent buffet, there is enough from the street food counters that you could give the regular buffet (except dessert of course) a miss.

One of the tough foods to give a fancy make over is the vada pav and the pav bhaji. The chefs here gave the former a beautiful makeover and the latter a not so good one. The vada pav here with a nice potato patty was served with a fried chilly inside. With super soft buns and a nice tangy potato inside, this was a good makeover to the usually humble vada pav. The pav bhaji, though served with the same nice pav simply didn’t match the vada pav.  At the end of the first counter, scores were tied and it was Street Food 1, 5 star 1. The chilly not being super spicy helped!

Then came the variation. A keema vada pav. No, not keema pav, but a keema vada pav. Or should we call it a Shami pav? Unlike the keema pav which comes with keema instead of a bhaji, this was a mutton cutlet stuffed inside the buns and served with the chilly on the side. I stuffed the chilly inside the bun and burnt my tongue. I guess no two chillies are the same, since the first one was not hot and this one was burning every cell of my digestive system. The kebab inside though was beautifully flavoured and I took another piece and took my chance with another chilly. They were made for each other, this time. See? You only need to find the right chilly in your life! 😉

Then we came to the Laksa counter. An Indonesian Laksa, the pet food counter of the exec chef Teku. There was no blachaang in the laksa, but he was able to bring out beautiful flavours in Laksa without it. Yes, the coconut milk seemed a little thicker, but this was a richer laksa. No blachaang, so street food wins. SF: 2, 5S: 1. There was the momo stall next to the Laksa. Variations of momos, but the one that stood out was the pan fried momo. No street food momo (at least in South India) I believe can match the flavour of this pan fried momo that has Asian flavours and succulent meat inside the juicy flour! 5star made up and the score is now 2:2

It came down to dessert. There was only one sweet counter. That day, it was the banana pancake. It looked like it was straight out of the streets of Bangkok, but I wasn’t going to make any judgements till I ate one. We watched as a chef behind the counter carefully stretched out the dough and heated it in the tawa. He sliced bananas and added all the condiments. Once folded, he dressed it with various sauces and placed a dollop of ice cream and handed it to us. I took one without the ice cream. Yes, it was nice, yes, it was flavourful, but no, it didn’t match the banana pancakes you get in Thailand! So, it was street food 3, 5 star 2.

Dessert from their regular buffet was as excellent as usual and it complemented the meal well. While there were only four counters for street food (and the cuisine changes every day, so maybe some day there will be a Doner or a Wurst stall), but if you have two helpings from each stall, it can fill you up. There is always the rest of the buffet if you need more to fill you!

The festival is on till the end of May and is priced along with the buffet at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt. 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2sa2sXW

5 Star, Chennai, Dessert, Eating out, Food Festivals, Indian, Indonesian, North Indian, Street Food

From the street to the 5 star hotel

Street food is meant to be eaten on the street. No amount of five star intervention has traditionally added anything more to street food. If anything, it has only diluted it. Some say that the sweat plays a role in the flavour. I hope I never find out if that is true, though. Some say that the heat and the air play roles in the flavours of the street. Some say that it is all of the above and more put together.

Every once in a while though, street food gets a good variation. Not better or worse, but a good variation. The ongoing street food festival at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt hotel, is one such. While it is a part of their usual excellent buffet, there is enough from the street food counters that you could give the regular buffet (except dessert of course) a miss.

One of the tough foods to give a fancy make over is the vada pav and the pav bhaji. The chefs here gave the former a beautiful makeover and the latter a not so good one. The vada pav here with a nice potato patty was served with a fried chilly inside. With super soft buns and a nice tangy potato inside, this was a good makeover to the usually humble vada pav. The pav bhaji, though served with the same nice pav simply didn’t match the vada pav.  At the end of the first counter, scores were tied and it was Street Food 1, 5 star 1. The chilly not being super spicy helped!

Then came the variation. A keema vada pav. No, not keema pav, but a keema vada pav. Or should we call it a Shami pav? Unlike the keema pav which comes with keema instead of a bhaji, this was a mutton cutlet stuffed inside the buns and served with the chilly on the side. I stuffed the chilly inside the bun and burnt my tongue. I guess no two chillies are the same, since the first one was not hot and this one was burning every cell of my digestive system. The kebab inside though was beautifully flavoured and I took another piece and took my chance with another chilly. They were made for each other, this time. See? You only need to find the right chilly in your life! 😉

Then we came to the Laksa counter. An Indonesian Laksa, the pet food counter of the exec chef Teku. There was no blachaang in the laksa, but he was able to bring out beautiful flavours in Laksa without it. Yes, the coconut milk seemed a little thicker, but this was a richer laksa. No blachaang, so street food wins. SF: 2, 5S: 1. There was the momo stall next to the Laksa. Variations of momos, but the one that stood out was the pan fried momo. No street food momo (at least in South India) I believe can match the flavour of this pan fried momo that has Asian flavours and succulent meat inside the juicy flour! 5star made up and the score is now 2:2

It came down to dessert. There was only one sweet counter. That day, it was the banana pancake. It looked like it was straight out of the streets of Bangkok, but I wasn’t going to make any judgements till I ate one. We watched as a chef behind the counter carefully stretched out the dough and heated it in the tawa. He sliced bananas and added all the condiments. Once folded, he dressed it with various sauces and placed a dollop of ice cream and handed it to us. I took one without the ice cream. Yes, it was nice, yes, it was flavourful, but no, it didn’t match the banana pancakes you get in Thailand! So, it was street food 3, 5 star 2.

Dessert from their regular buffet was as excellent as usual and it complemented the meal well. While there were only four counters for street food (and the cuisine changes every day, so maybe some day there will be a Doner or a Wurst stall), but if you have two helpings from each stall, it can fill you up. There is always the rest of the buffet if you need more to fill you!

The festival is on till the end of May and is priced along with the buffet at The Dining Room, Park Hyatt. 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2sa2sXW

Chennai, Chocolate, Coffee, Dessert, Eating out, Vegan, Waffles

When Chocolate and Waffle say, “I do.”

Chocolates and waffles generally flirt with each other. There is some caressing at best with chocolate happy to be a topping as a sauce on the waffle or in the form of a chocolate ice cream in varying stages of blah. But a full time commitment? Rare. But like anything done with commitment, when chocolate decides to commit itself to the waffle, the result is magical. Like any committed relationship, not everything is sweet. Not everything is bitter, but the magic is in the ability to appreciate both. Throw in friends like coffee and banana once in a while, we have a winner!

Marriages more often than not, need a pastor. In this case, there were two. Nitin Chordia from Cocotrait and Christoph from Wafobel together decided to marry these two things. Both are extremely fond of their respective kids, Nitin a chocolate stalwart and Christoph, the father of Wafobel, decided to the honours themselves!

Rich pure in house Chocolate mixed with the Belgian waffle batter should make any dessert fan go weak on the knees. But if that gives you thoughts of having a super sweet waffle, think again. The batter is folded with chocolate so there is chocolate everywhere. Inside, outside, on the crust, in your mouth; simply everywhere. Then there is more. Friends add spice to life and in the waffle world, friends like peanut butter and banana join in the Peanut Choco Waffle to create a nice variation. When they wanted to be by themselves, they were doing the Classic Fudge, a beautiful classic love story. Thick fudge gives you memories with bitter sweetness. And they get a little creative with the Chip n Nib waffle, where there is both the chocolate chips and the cocoa nibs in the waffle. I guess this happens when the chocolate decides to emphasise its role in the relationship a little more. No complaints.

Bring two wonderful things together is a challenge. You can bring wonderful ingredients, but bringing a DISH, that too a tried tested and loved one like waffle with an INGREDIENT, again a tried tested and loved (OK loved is an understatement for chocolate), is not easy, but these two have pulled it off. I believe there has been a lot of preparation to make sure this works. After all it is the bringing together of two feisty ones! Oh this is an inter-country marriage too. The Belgian Waffle with the Indian Chocolate!

The festival is on till the end May. The fact that besides bringing joy to the tongue, it is also a joy to the heart. Beyond the ‘heart’ in a relationship, I’m talking about the heart that pumps blood. With no butter, no cream and the fat coming purely from cocoa butter, this is healthy. Now that is a winning combination! 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2p3HhaF

Chennai, Chocolate, Coffee, Dessert, Eating out, Vegan, Waffles

When Chocolate and Waffle say, “I do.”

Chocolates and waffles generally flirt with each other. There is some caressing at best with chocolate happy to be a topping as a sauce on the waffle or in the form of a chocolate ice cream in varying stages of blah. But a full time commitment? Rare. But like anything done with commitment, when chocolate decides to commit itself to the waffle, the result is magical. Like any committed relationship, not everything is sweet. Not everything is bitter, but the magic is in the ability to appreciate both. Throw in friends like coffee and banana once in a while, we have a winner!

Marriages more often than not, need a pastor. In this case, there were two. Nitin Chordia from Cocotrait and Christoph from Wafobel together decided to marry these two things. Both are extremely fond of their respective kids, Nitin a chocolate stalwart and Christoph, the father of Wafobel, decided to the honours themselves!

Rich pure in house Chocolate mixed with the Belgian waffle batter should make any dessert fan go weak on the knees. But if that gives you thoughts of having a super sweet waffle, think again. The batter is folded with chocolate so there is chocolate everywhere. Inside, outside, on the crust, in your mouth; simply everywhere. Then there is more. Friends add spice to life and in the waffle world, friends like peanut butter and banana join in the Peanut Choco Waffle to create a nice variation. When they wanted to be by themselves, they were doing the Classic Fudge, a beautiful classic love story. Thick fudge gives you memories with bitter sweetness. And they get a little creative with the Chip n Nib waffle, where there is both the chocolate chips and the cocoa nibs in the waffle. I guess this happens when the chocolate decides to emphasise its role in the relationship a little more. No complaints.

Bring two wonderful things together is a challenge. You can bring wonderful ingredients, but bringing a DISH, that too a tried tested and loved one like waffle with an INGREDIENT, again a tried tested and loved (OK loved is an understatement for chocolate), is not easy, but these two have pulled it off. I believe there has been a lot of preparation to make sure this works. After all it is the bringing together of two feisty ones! Oh this is an inter-country marriage too. The Belgian Waffle with the Indian Chocolate!

The festival is on till the end May. The fact that besides bringing joy to the tongue, it is also a joy to the heart. Beyond the ‘heart’ in a relationship, I’m talking about the heart that pumps blood. With no butter, no cream and the fat coming purely from cocoa butter, this is healthy. Now that is a winning combination! 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2p3HhaF

Chennai, Chocolate, Coffee, Dessert, Eating out, Vegan, Waffles

When Chocolate and Waffle say, “I do.”

Chocolates and waffles generally flirt with each other. There is some caressing at best with chocolate happy to be a topping as a sauce on the waffle or in the form of a chocolate ice cream in varying stages of blah. But a full time commitment? Rare. But like anything done with commitment, when chocolate decides to commit itself to the waffle, the result is magical. Like any committed relationship, not everything is sweet. Not everything is bitter, but the magic is in the ability to appreciate both. Throw in friends like coffee and banana once in a while, we have a winner!

Marriages more often than not, need a pastor. In this case, there were two. Nitin Chordia from Cocotrait and Christoph from Wafobel together decided to marry these two things. Both are extremely fond of their respective kids, Nitin a chocolate stalwart and Christoph, the father of Wafobel, decided to the honours themselves!

Rich pure in house Chocolate mixed with the Belgian waffle batter should make any dessert fan go weak on the knees. But if that gives you thoughts of having a super sweet waffle, think again. The batter is folded with chocolate so there is chocolate everywhere. Inside, outside, on the crust, in your mouth; simply everywhere. Then there is more. Friends add spice to life and in the waffle world, friends like peanut butter and banana join in the Peanut Choco Waffle to create a nice variation. When they wanted to be by themselves, they were doing the Classic Fudge, a beautiful classic love story. Thick fudge gives you memories with bitter sweetness. And they get a little creative with the Chip n Nib waffle, where there is both the chocolate chips and the cocoa nibs in the waffle. I guess this happens when the chocolate decides to emphasise its role in the relationship a little more. No complaints.

Bring two wonderful things together is a challenge. You can bring wonderful ingredients, but bringing a DISH, that too a tried tested and loved one like waffle with an INGREDIENT, again a tried tested and loved (OK loved is an understatement for chocolate), is not easy, but these two have pulled it off. I believe there has been a lot of preparation to make sure this works. After all it is the bringing together of two feisty ones! Oh this is an inter-country marriage too. The Belgian Waffle with the Indian Chocolate!

The festival is on till the end May. The fact that besides bringing joy to the tongue, it is also a joy to the heart. Beyond the ‘heart’ in a relationship, I’m talking about the heart that pumps blood. With no butter, no cream and the fat coming purely from cocoa butter, this is healthy. Now that is a winning combination! 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2p3HhaF

Chennai, Dessert, Dessert Pub, Drink, Eating out, Ice Creams, Milk Shake

Thick Shake Factory

Nothing gets the point across like saying exactly what you mean. Thick Shake Factory does that and does that well. No distractions. Just thick shakes. No distractions in the name, the interiors or anywhere.

While the menu has sufficient variety, considering that these are just shakes, the possibilities are endless with Shape Your Shake. That is what we got two of. First, a chocolate base, Level 1 mix in was Choco Pie, Level 2 was Hide n Seek (the biscuits) and the topping was Gems. The second drink had a base of Hazelnut, Level 1 was Ferrero, Level 2 was banana and topping was butterscotch nuts.

I know I got the gems topping but as I took my first sip, gems came through the straw. That for me was unbelievable. It wasn’t just a topping, but had boatloads inside. The chocolate ice cream was the strongest and the choice-pie, the weakest of the flavours. Honestly, I couldn’t taste any of the choco-pie. The second drink was similar with the Level 1 mix in. The hazelnut ice cream lent its nutty flavours, Ferrero was non existent and banana flavours shone through. Again, loads of butterscotch nuts that kept coming through the straw.

The portion looked small, but was terribly a lot, simply because of the consistency. I won’t be surprised if I held the cup upside down and nothing fell. It was super thick. We couldn’t finish the drink and it doubled up as a post dinner drink the subsequent night.

Priced between Rs. 140 and Rs. 190, Thick Shake Factory on KNK road is a fantastic new addition to Chennai’s grub scene. Unpretentious, clear goals and excellent shakes. I only wish they tweak their recipe a little bit to enhance their Level 1 mix flavours. I would have loved a little more choco-pie in my shake! 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2mhKzq0

Uncategorized

Thick Shake Factory

Nothing gets the point across like saying exactly what you mean. Thick Shake Factory does that and does that well. No distractions. Just thick shakes. No distractions in the name, the interiors or anywhere.

While the menu has sufficient variety, considering that these are just shakes, the possibilities are endless with Shape Your Shake. That is what we got two of. First, a chocolate base, Level 1 mix in was Choco Pie, Level 2 was Hide n Seek (the biscuits) and the topping was Gems. The second drink had a base of Hazelnut, Level 1 was Ferrero, Level 2 was banana and topping was butterscotch nuts.

I know I got the gems topping but as I took my first sip, gems came through the straw. That for me was unbelievable. It wasn’t just a topping, but had boatloads inside. The chocolate ice cream was the strongest and the choice-pie, the weakest of the flavours. Honestly, I couldn’t taste any of the choco-pie. The second drink was similar with the Level 1 mix in. The hazelnut ice cream lent its nutty flavours, Ferrero was non existent and banana flavours shone through. Again, loads of butterscotch nuts that kept coming through the straw.

The portion looked small, but was terribly a lot, simply because of the consistency. I won’t be surprised if I held the cup upside down and nothing fell. It was super thick. We couldn’t finish the drink and it doubled up as a post dinner drink the subsequent night.

Priced between Rs. 140 and Rs. 190, Thick Shake Factory on KNK road is a fantastic new addition to Chennai’s grub scene. Unpretentious, clear goals and excellent shakes. I only wish they tweak their recipe a little bit to enhance their Level 1 mix flavours. I would have loved a little more choco-pie in my shake! 

via Blogger http://ift.tt/2mhKzq0